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Marietta IR-5 Visa Lawyer

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Marietta IR-5 Visa Lawyer

The IR in IR-5 Visa stands for an immediate relative. The United States Department of State notes that IR visas are based on close family relationships with U.S. citizens. The number of these immigrants is not limited each fiscal year. These are different from family preference visas, which are subject to annual limits.

An IR-5 visa will let a parent or parents of a U.S. citizen lawfully live and work in the United States. United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has a page dedicated to green cards for immediate relatives of U.S. citizens on its website.

Contact a Marietta IR-5 Visa Lawyer

If you need help obtaining an IR-5 visa in Marietta or a surrounding Georgia area, make sure you retain legal counsel. You will want an attorney who handles family immigration & naturalization cases.

By having legal representation, you will be more likely to get the results you are seeking and also help expedite the application process. Do not hesitate to call our firm or contact us online so you can schedule a free consultation and talk to an immigration and asylum lawyer.

What is an IR-5 Visa?

The IR-5 visa allows a parent or parents of a U.S. citizen to lawfully live and work in the United States by granting lawful permanent resident (LPR) status. To apply for this visa, the citizen child must be at least 21 years of age to sponsor the parent or parents for a green card.

When a parent does not reside in the United States, you will have to file an I-130, Petition for Alien Relative, with supporting documentation that may include a birth certificate and the petitioner’s proof of citizenship. If the parent is already in the U.S., then you can apply to adjust their Status using Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence, or Adjust Status, which will be filed with Form I-130.

Who Is Eligible for an IR-5 Visa?

Who Is Eligible for an IR-5 Visa?

Eligibility for an IR-5 visa requires all of the following to be true:

  • The sponsor is a U.S. citizen.
  • The sponsor is 21 years of age or older.
  • The sponsor has the financial means to support the parent until they begin working.
  • The sponsor lives in the United States and has a U.S. address.
  • The sponsor includes a copy of their birth certificate to prove their relationship with the parent.

How a Marietta IR-5 Visa Lawyer Can Help You

Did you need help obtaining an IR-5 visa in Marietta? You will want to be sure that you hire an experienced immigration law attorney.

It can be tremendously beneficial for you to work with a lawyer because they will have handled many of these cases before, and they can prepare you for any issues you might encounter and know the best ways to respond. Make sure you call an attorney or contact them online to set up a free consultation.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the supporting documents for an IR-5 visa?

The IR5 visa involves different supporting documents depending on both the parent and the circumstances of the sponsor’s birth. When a mother is applying from outside the United States, a sponsoring child has to submit a copy of their birth certificate that shows their name and their mother’s name and a copy of their U.S. passport or Certificate of Naturalization if they were not born in the United States.

When a father applies from outside the country, a sponsoring child has to submit a copy of their birth certificate showing both their name and the names of both parents, a copy of their U.S. passport or Certificate of Naturalization if they were not born in the United States and a copy of their parents’ civil marriage certificate. If a father lives outside the United States and the sponsoring child was born out of wedlock and was not legally recognized by their father before their 18th birthday, then they will have to submit a copy of their birth certificate showing both their name and their father’s name, a copy of their U.S. passport or Certificate of Naturalization if they were not born in the United States, and evidence of an emotional or financial bond before the child was married or reached 21 years of age. When a father lives outside the country and the sponsoring child was born out of wedlock but was legitimated by their father before their 18th birthday, then supporting documents will be a copy of their birth certificate showing both their name and their father’s name, a copy of their U.S. passport or Certificate of Naturalization if they were not born in the United States, and evidence that the sponsoring child was legitimated before their 18th birthday through either the marriage of the natural parents, the laws of their birth state or country, or the laws of their father’s birth state or country.

When sponsoring children petitions to bring a stepparent to the United States, they have to submit a copy of their birth certificate showing the names of their birth parents, a copy of their U.S. passport, or a Certificate of Naturalization if they were not born in the United States, a copy of a civil marriage certificate for the birth parent to the stepparent proving that the marriage occurred before a sponsoring child’s 18th birthday, and a copy of any divorce decree, death certificate, or annulment decree demonstrating that any previous marriage entered into by the sponsoring child’s natural or stepparent ended legally.

If the sponsoring child petitions to bring adoptive parents to the country, they will have to submit a copy of their birth certificate, a copy of their U.S. passport or Certificate of Naturalization if they were not born in the United States, a certified copy of the adoption certificate proving the adoption took place before the sponsoring child’s 16th birthday, and a statement proving the dates and places the sponsoring child lived together with their parents.

How long is the U.S. parent visa valid?

An IR-5 parent will receive a 10-year green card in the mail a month or two after their arrival in the United States.

Can I sponsor my brothers and sisters on the same petition as my parents?

No. When a sponsor’s parents have minor children abroad, they cannot be sponsored on the same petition. A petition will instead have to be presented separately by the sponsor or by the parents after they become green card holders.

Practice Areas

  • Family Based
  • Employment Based
  • Citizenship
  • Humanitarian Relief
  • Investor Visas
Check your Visa Eligibility
Marriage Green Card through Consular ProcessFor married couples where the foreign-born spouse lives abroad
Marriage Green Card: Adjustment of StatusFor married couples in the U.S.
K-1 Fiancé VisaFor unmarried couples where the foreign-born spouse lives abroad
Removal of ConditionsFor those with expiring 2-year green cards
IR-2 Child VisaFor U.S. citizens with children outside of the U.S.
B1/B2 Tourist VisaFor individuals looking to travel to the U.S.
IR-5 Parent VisaFor U.S. citizens with foreign-born parents
U.S. Citizenship (Naturalization)For green card holders ready to become U.S. citizens
I-90 Green Card Renewal or ReplacementFor current green card holders
H-1B VisaFor foreign professionals who want to work in the U.S.
EB-5 VisaFor investors who want to immigrate to the U.S.
E-2 VisaFor foreign investors to start a U.S. business
L-1 VisaFor multinational companies that want to transfer employees to the U.S.
O-1 VisaFor companies that want to bring extraordinary foreign talent to the U.S.
R-1 VisaFor religious workers who need a temporary U.S. visa
TN VisaFor citizens of Mexico and Canada who work in certain professions
F-1 Student VisaFor foreign students who want to study in the U.S.
NaturalizationFor permanent residents ready to become U.S. citizens
Adjustment of StatusFor immigrants looking to adjust their status
Denials & DelaysHelp with delays or denials in the immigration process
Derivative CitizenshipFor foreign-born children with a U.S. parent
Deportation DefenseLegal assistance and protection against deportation
DACAFor certain people who entered the U.S. unlawfully as children
AsylumFor individuals and families seeking asylum
U-VisaFor crime victims who are in fear of deportation
T-VisaFor victims of human trafficking
Affirmative Deferred Action
EB-5For investors and employers wanting to move to the U.S.
E-2 VisaFor investors and employers wanting to move to the U.S.

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